In a possible advance for diabetics, UC San Diego has created a way to measure glucose with a special ink that’s applied to the skin with an ordinary pen. The “bio ink” causes a chemical reaction that reveals glucose levels which are then read by a small wearable sensor. “This is a proof-of-concept step that […]

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Editor’s Note: Perfect timing for our 10 Year Celebration with Science of Beer on 10-23 –bit.ly/1uyZztU  We know that yeasts produce the molecules that make ales and lagers so aromatic. But why do they do it? Whether you’re catching a whiff of banana from a tall glass of Hefewiezen or enjoying the subtle floral aromas […]

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Editor’s Note: We offer this excellent article from Wolters Kluwer Health Law Daily in which NanoTecNexus was invited to contribute a market perspective.  Enjoy. STRATEGIC PERSPECTIVES: Tiny particles with big implications: Nanotechnology and the FDA By Danielle H. Capilla, JD, Senior Writer Analyst, Wolters Kluwer Law & Business Nanomaterials, materials measured in nanometers or approximately […]

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Something unexpected happened when scientists at the University of California, Riverside, started stringing together nanoparticles of gold. Gold Nanoparticles – Plain or Functionalized Spherical, from 5nm to 7nm The gold wasn’t golden anymore. It changed colors. “When we see these gold particles aggregate, we find out they have very, very beautiful blue colors,” chemist Yadong […]

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New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) researchers have developed a paint for use in coatings and packaging that changes color when exposed to high temperatures, delivering a visual warning to people handling material or equipment with the potential to malfunction, explode, or cause burns when overheated. The technology was commissioned and funded by the U.S. […]

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  Chances are that the touchscreen on your smartphone or tablet incorporates a coating of indium tin oxide, also known as ITO or tin-doped indium oxide. Although it’s electrically conductive and optically transparent, it’s also brittle and thus easily-shattered. Scientists at Ohio’s University of Akron, however, are developing something that could ultimately replace the material. […]

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Technology & Science – CBC News – Clean-freak’s dream: Superhydrophobic coatings repel water, dirt. Nissan painted half of a test vehicle in a superhydrophobic paint. Mud and water just slid off the car. In other tests, rain bounced right off superhydrophobic-coated windshields in severe storms, without the use of the car’s wipers.Nissan painted half of […]

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